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The Thrilling Freedom of Making a Movie with No Money

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Let’s say you desperately want to make a feature film, but you don’t have any money to do it. Can you scrape together a few thousand? Good, because writer/director Joshua Caldwell and producer Travis Oberlander join us this week to explain how they made Layover for only $6,000.

Beyond making a movie for a few months’ rent, Geoff and I will answer your screenwriting questions and continue our star-spangled conversation from last week by exploring the concepts of Freedom and Revolution as they apply (for better and worse) to filmmaking.

You should follow Caldwell (@joshua_caldwell), Travis Oberlander (@tobewan), the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis.

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The Most Star Spangled Movie in America

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For our extra special Independence Day Eagle-Blasted, Star-Spangled, Overly-Adjectived Extravaganza, Geoff and I ponder the very nature of the United States of America. We try to hone in on its complexities and paradoxes by contemplating what movies best capture Columbia’s essence. In other words, the most American movies ever made. Is there a particular genre that echoes its spirit? Is it more about pure patriotism or can the story display our darker side? Where does the heart of American cinema lie?

Listen and contemplate while you grill meat stuffed into another meat, or as you slide down the tarp you poured dish soap onto.

Plus, to celebrate our victory over the British, we invite the absolutely delightful Maisie Williams onto the show to discuss her new movie Heatstroke, explain why she’s not Justin Bieber and share her love for Twitter.

You should follow Williams (@maisie_williams), the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis.

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2,670-Second Screenwriting Lessons

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In less than 300 days, writer/producer/director Brian Koppelman has delivered 300 screenwriting lessons, 6 seconds at a time. That’s a half hour of Vines that act as miniature cattle prods for anyone looking to have the creative section of their brain lit up.

To celebrate the achievement, Brian joins me to explain what a beloved cookie has to do with the writing process, to describe the methods he uses to get unstuck, and to challenge a conventional way of thinking about “breaking into the business.”

You should follow Brian (@briankoppelman), the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis.

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Nothing But Positive Things

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This week on the show, 13 Sins director Daniel Stamm reveals what he’d sell his soul for, discusses The Hero’s Journey as addiction and describes how he’s using his knowledge of movie marketing (and misleading trailers) to subvert the system. They should really let German directors make more rom-coms.

Plus, Geoff and I will break down movie scenes that make us break down in order to figure out how they make us cry. Fair warning: the first ten minutes of Up will be discussed. Come prepared.

You should follow Daniel Stamm (@stammdaniel), the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis.

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For What You Love

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This post is in partnership with Cadillac 

Cadillac and the Producers Guild of America recently launched Make Your Mark, a short film competition that challenges producers to create compelling content with limited resources. Contestants will make a short film over a single weekend in late June, and the 30-second Cadillac spot featuring the grand prize winner’s film will air during the 2015 Academy Awards.

As such we’ll be speaking with last year’s winner Jason Shulz, who offers his experience and some helpful lessons for those filmmakers who want to hoist the trophy for themselves this year.

Plus, in a segment that tears us apart, Geoff and I will chat about the pure, accidental brilliance of The Room and what it’s like to watch an unintentionally terrible movie while sitting next to its director.

Last, but definitely not least, we’ll talk to Enlisted creator Kevin Biegel about why he’s fighting so hard to promote a show that’s already been cancelled. He’ll also offer some keen advice about breaking into TV writing that you won’t want to miss.

You should follow Kevin Biegel (@kbiegel), the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis.

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About time someone said it like it was in this crazy industry we're in. Keep up the good work. JDS

Asked by Anonymous

We will try our best. Most of the time. Promise.

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Amazing Movies You Have to Wait a Year to See

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Last year around this time we were growing tired of the summer blockbuster bloat, so we took a break by looking ahead to the future that’s now the present. We’re feeling a bit winded yet again by all the city-stomping, stadium-lifting largeness, so it’s time to take refuge once again in the eternal potential of amazing movies that we can’t see for another year. Yes, the summer blockbusters of 2015.

Fortunately, old robot Arnold Schwarzenegger and Hulk are here to guide us.

Plus, we’ll discuss the concept of raising stakes in screenwriting by examining some movies that do it well, and we’ll praise Tom Cruise’s decades-long excellent for no other reason than to praise him.

Follow the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis.

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When it comes time to market myself and my newest script for representation, how do I get around the fact my chosen genre, "romantic comedies", has taken potshots and ample criticism the past few years? I don't want to veil it or call it something it's not, nor do I want to be defensive. Still, I can't help but wonder if I've put myself behind the proverbial 8 ball. I love writing about misfits, underdogs, laggards, lovelorn, & inept romantics. Simply write a killer logline without noting genre?

Asked by Anonymous

Thanks for the question. We answered it as part of our last show “Not Talking Marvel With Clark Gregg.”

Summary: be loud and proud about your chosen genre.

Thanks again!

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Not Talking Marvel with Clark Gregg

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Clark Gregg recently wrote, directed and starred in an indie called Trust Me, and instead of asking one question about it before moving on to nine questions about Marvel movies, we took the opportunity to dig deep into what’s clearly a very personal work. In the movie he plays a former child actor turned child actor agent (have fun, Psych majors) who discovers an amazingly gifted young actress who might join a major franchise and bring him the success he’s always dreamed of. Spoiler alert: Loki never shows up.

Plus, Geoff and I answer your screenwriting questions and then discuss some bizarre real-life things that would make amazing movies.

Follow the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis.

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A Brief History of Changing History

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What if you could go back in time and set your favorite shark-jumping movie franchise back on the right course? Which would you choose? How would you do it? Would it require Hugh Jackman getting naked and standing in front of a window?

We tackle all of these questions on this week’s show as we try to right some cinematic wrongs, review X-Men: Days of Future Past in depth and dissect a famous scene from Back to the Future (see below) to figure out why it works so damned well. We’ve got time travel and changing history on our minds, so let us use our mutant powers on your ear drums so we can all head back to the 1970s.

You might feel a pinch.

Follow the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis.

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